Review: Exit, Pursued by a Bear

Exit, Pursued by a Bear
Exit, Pursued by a Bear by E.K. Johnston

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

BRIDGE: (obvious) A Winter’s Tale by Shakespeare, Tess of the D’Ubervilles by Thomas Hardy, or House of Mirth by Edith Wharton

READ ALIKES: The Accident Season by Moira Fowley-Doyle, Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson, or

REVIEW: I’m usually a sucker for a happy ending, but this one left me with a weird taste in my mouth. I saw E.K. Johnston speak at ALAN in Nov. 2016, and I knew it would be an idealistic portrayal of a rape victim’s experience. I found myself continually thinking “Wow. That would never happen that way” or “Hermione is really handling this well”. On one hand, this book could be a good “instructional” read for families and communities on How To Deal with rape cases and victims. On the other hand, this could have an adverse affect on rape victims themselves. Hermione is so calm and well-adjusted throughout her ordeal, I worry that any reader who may have had an experience with sexual assault or is the victim of rape will feel that any reaction other than one like Hermione’s is a “wrong” reaction. While a situation like this without stumbling is sometimes reality, it is hardly the norm and I worry that it’s too easy.

That being said, Johnston’s writing is great and Hermione’s life and community are fullfilling. I also enjoyed a look into a high school cheerleading world that doesn’t involve airheads or cattiness. Again, perhaps not 100% reality, but cheerleaders get a bad wrap in YA and it’s nice to see the commitment to competition and their sport. Polly is a tremendous best friend and we should all be so lucky to have such a loyally fierce and supportive person in our corner. It’s a lovely snapshot of what humankind could be if we choose love and support.

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Review: One for the Murphys

One for the Murphys
One for the Murphys by Lynda Mullaly Hunt

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

The sobbing. It was not The Ugly Cry but fairly consistent tears for the last 30 pages or so. Hunt does an incredible job with Carley’s toughened sensitivity. There are so many times I wanted to shake her and then immediately pull her into a hug. Carley’s story of ending up in a foster home is one of neglect rather than blatant abuse. The realistically tragic part about it is that Carley, like so many kids, doesn’t realize she deserves more. She even assumes the Murphys are mocking her or trying to pull one over on her because their love and affection seems so unnatural to Carley. As Carley comes to terms with her mother’s actions and her situation, she begins to see other families’ dysfunctions and compromises. She learns the value of honesty and sharing oneself with others as a means to connection and hope.

Julie Murphy is a silent, immovable force of acceptance in this book. It’s not just the love that she gives Carley that is so important but the message she transmits with her words and actions (over and over again) that Carley IS ok. That being Carley is ok in and of itself and that there’s nothing she needs to do to earn or deserve the acceptance or love of those who are important to her. Julie’s own history provides this wisdom, and her determination to make a difference for Carley and launch her into believing in her own LIFE is bittersweet. She knows it must be done and knows that the right outcome could be even harder than the path that brought Carley into the Murphys lives.

An easy read with memorable characters, a poignant ending, and a fantastic message, One for the Murphys has something for everyone.

SIMILAR TITLES: See You at Harry’s by Jo Knowles, Pictures of Hollis Woods by Patricia Reilly Giff, A Corner of the Universe by Ann M. Martin

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4 May 2015

Mon Reading Button PB to YAIt’s Monday! What are you Reading? is a meme hosted by Sheila at Book Journeys. It is a great way to recap what you read and/or reviewed the previous week and to plan out your reading and reviews for the upcoming week. It’s also a great chance to see what others are reading right now…who knows, you might discover that next “must read” book!
The lovelies at teachmentortexts.com thought this would be a fun meme to start up with a kidlit focus: anyone reading and reviewing books in children’s literature. It can be picture books, chapter books, middle grade novels, young adult novels – you name it in the world of kidlit and it’s in! I love being a part of this meme and hope you do, too! I encourage everyone participating to go and visit the other kidlit book bloggers that link up and to comment on as many posts as you can. We love talking books and believe in sharing and discussing what we’re reading. We hope you join us! Read more here: http://www.teachmentortexts.com/#ixzz2R9UNmFll
In the last week I’ve finished
 
This week, I’m reading, planning on reading and listening to

Review and Bridge: Vanishing Girls by Lauren Oliver

Vanishing Girls
Vanishing Girls by Lauren Oliver

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I’m always wary of Lauren Oliver’s YA books. For some reason, the end of her Delirium series REQUIEM left me with a bad taste in my mouth and I haven’t been able to get over it. However, VANISHING GIRLS does not disappoint. Reminiscent of PANIC, the story takes place in a small community. The sisters in the story sound like any set of siblings one might encounter who are too close to be indifferent to one another and too different to stay close as they grow up. Throw in a divorce and a horrible car accident and readers have the recipe for a perfect realistic mystery.

Just like with PANIC, the scariest part about Dara and Nick’s predicament is that it could happen. Readers will sense in Nick’s desperation to reconnect with Dara that something is not right. Parker’s estrangement from the sisters also sets off some alarm bells and leaves one wondering exactly what went wrong on that particular stretch of highway. There are clues to the ultimate reveal that savvy readers will pick up on, but it would be hard to accurately nail down the ultimate resolution.

Again, it took me a bit to get into the story. I was just about to put it down when it got really engaging. Nick and Dara tend to blur a little in the beginning because they are so close in age and the story switches back and forth between their voices. This seems intentional on Oliver’s part given the premise of the story. By the end of the book I wanted to shake the characters until their teeth rattled. Overall, a very realistic portrayal of teens struggling with trauma.

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BRIDGE BOOKS: One could lead students to other psychological thrillers like “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” by Ambrose Bierce, “The Yellow Wallpaper” by Charlotte Perkins Gillman, “A Rose for Emily” by William Faulkner, or SULA by Toni Morrison.